You Don’t Have to be a Basketball Superpower to be Successful

Well, it’s that time of year again.  March Madness, to many sports fans, is the best season of them all.  Numerous games over a three week period, every game means something, loser leaves town, the highest high and the lowest low, and players shedding tears, some for joy, most for sorrow.  If you like sports, it’s hard not to get a lot of enjoyment out of the tournament.

Everyone has their favorite team, but I always enjoy watching a mid size school, where kids go to get an education, beating one of the powerhouses.  If your favorite team is Kentucky, Kansas (too bad), or Duke (which is mine), you know that they are going to have a pretty good year and be in the tournament.  But imagine what it is like to be a Cornell or a Northern Iowa fan.  The excitement because not only are they are there, but they are winning games.  My daughter was in Iowa over the weekend and she said the whole state is going crazy.  All you heard about was Northern Iowa.

Now, you may be asking yourself where am I going with this?  How does this relate to business?  Go with me on this…..

These other schools are proving that you don’t have to be a basketball superpower to be successful.  These smaller schools may not have the biggest recruiting budget or the best facilities in the world or are able to attract a player that only plans on being in school for one year before moving on to the NBA.  Yet, the Cornell’s of the world can be successful.  Maybe you have to think a little more and do things in a smaller scale, but do it right and you can come out on top.

Not every company can be AT&T, Shell Oil, or Microsoft.  These are the powerhouses.  Most companies are like Cornell and Northern Iowa.  They may not have the largest budgets or the newest manufacturing facility or office building, but they can certainly compete with the big boys, even beating them from time to time.  It may not be easy, but it is done every day.  Take a good product/service, team it with a modest budget, good management from the top and a top effort by the employees and you have yourself a winner.

I have found that to be successful you have to think that way.  Just because you are a smaller company doesn’t mean that you don’t do things the right way.  Your marketing, product, approach all have to be first class.  The difference might be that you don’t do as much as the AT&T’s of the world.  Cut back on quantity, not quality.  That goes from the product, to the packaging, to how we interact with our customers.

How do you interact with your current and potential customers?  I don’t mean your top 10 customers, but all of the others.   Do you interact with them as much as you should?  The Pfizer Pharmaceuticals of the world have two sales forces that call on the same doctor, just to get that much more selling time with the physicians.  I don’t know too many companies that can do that.

If your sales force is you, if it is small, if it is too busy to meet new clients, if you don’t really know what your sales people are doing, you may need a little assistance in getting in front of your customers and potential clients as often as you should.  Many companies are now outsourcing in a number of departments.  You can outsource your HR department.  I know of companies that don’t even touch the product they sell.  The manufacturing, packaging and shipping are all outsourced.  That goes for your sales efforts as well.  At Randolph Sterling, we can be the added sales force, interacting with your potential customers that you don’t have the time to see.  We can relieve you of the stress of doing lead generation.  We will report to you exactly what we do each week so you would know exactly what is going on.

If you have sales people with little guidance, we offer our sales management services as well.

You may not be Kentucky, or Duke or Kansas.  Few of us are.  However, if your goal is to become a Cornell or St. Mary’s, we can certainly assist your company in reaching that level.

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